Pump Up Your Book Promotion Virtual Book Tours

What I'm Reading
Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetuer adipiscing elit. Duis ligula lorem, consequat eget, tristique nec, auctor quis, purus. Vivamus ut sem. Fusce aliquam nunc vitae purus.
Other things
Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetuer adipiscing elit. Duis ligula lorem, consequat eget, tristique nec, auctor quis, purus. Vivamus ut sem. Fusce aliquam nunc vitae purus.
Other things
Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetuer adipiscing elit. Duis ligula lorem, consequat eget, tristique nec, auctor quis, purus. Vivamus ut sem. Fusce aliquam nunc vitae purus.
Other things
Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetuer adipiscing elit. Duis ligula lorem, consequat eget, tristique nec, auctor quis, purus. Vivamus ut sem. Fusce aliquam nunc vitae purus.
Other things
Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetuer adipiscing elit. Duis ligula lorem, consequat eget, tristique nec, auctor quis, purus. Vivamus ut sem. Fusce aliquam nunc vitae purus.
Wednesday, July 25, 2007
THE GHOST MIRROR by Jamieson Wolf
I wrote my favourite novel when I was unemployed.

I was working for a temp company doing office work and for three horrendous weeks, they had no work for me. I was going crazy, climbing the walls with anxiety. Would I be able to pay my share of the rent? Would they have work for me soon? What is the square root of six hundred and twenty four?

In short, I was going slowly crazy.

Deciding to do something productive with my time, I decided to write. I had been playing with the idea of writing a children’s novel featuring my tortoiseshell calico cat Mave. The trouble was, every time I tried something, it didn’t work for me. I just couldn’t get something that I liked on paper. Most writers will tell you that almost everything they write is crap. I believe this has something to do with what I call the Tragic Artists Clause: Artists are their own worst critics.
So how did I come to write what I think is my favourite novel? Simple, I stopped trying.

That’s not to say I didn’t write. Hell, for the first week, I wrote more than I had in a long time. But the trouble was, I didn’t like anything. So I stopped pushing myself so hard and picked up something I had put away. It was an idea for a very dark children’s story, something along the lines of The Brothers Grimm, but with a darker twist; if such a thing is possible.

I had put the notes and jottings away because I thought it was too dark, too scary. I had written a simple prologue that I thought was the beginning of a short story, but it had other ideas. The prologue featured the horrible Mr. Lavender, a man with pale gray skin who wore a lavender coloured coat. Having no soul of his own, he fed off the souls of children to survive, to live, and took their magic.

Looking back now, I know that I put the notes away because I was afraid. I knew that this story, this novel, would be one of the best things I had written. I also knew that if I started it, I would not be able to stop. I had mentioned this to my step father who surprised me. He gave me the best piece of advice that I had ever heard. It also happened to be the only good piece of advice that he’d ever give me, but that’s beside the point.

“Why are you so afraid?” He asked. “A beginning should be an adventure, not a fear.”
I mumbled that he was probably right and he laughed. “Of course I am. Things happen for a reason. You’re unemployed now because someone wants you to finish your novel. This novel is important. You were meant to write it and now you have the time.” He paused. “Do you have a title for it?”

“The Ghost Mirror.” I whispered.

“Then write it. Just sit down to it and write it. It’s waiting for you to let it out.”
And what do you know? For the first time in his life, my step father was right. When I sat down at my computer later that afternoon, the story came pouring out of me. I had never had this happen for me. Normally writing is like pulling teeth; the story takes forever for me to shape it, to get it the way I want on the page.

With The Ghost Mirror, it was the first time I saw a story clearly from the beginning to the middle through to the end. And that’s not all. I also saw the next two books, The Silver Glass and The Last Witch and prayed that my little heroine, a red haired Witch called Mave Mallory, would be strong enough to survive them.

By the end of the three weeks, I had finished The Ghost Mirror and drawn out the outlines for the next two novels. I read the novel again and again wondering how a story like this could have come out of me. It was as if someone else had written it, as if my words were a gift from someone else.

I am still in awe over The Ghost Mirror. It still gives me chills when I read it, when I look at the cover, when I think of what Mave still has in store for herself. It’s going to be a long road but I’m glad fate stepped in when it did so that I could start her journey with her.

But you’re probably wondering about my getting a job? Did the temp company call me back? You bet’cha. The day after I had finished the last of the outlines for The Silver Glass and The Last Witch, my temp company called.

They had work for me again.

Jamieson Wolf
Author, The Ghost Mirror
http://www.jamiesonwolf.com/

###

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Labels:

posted by Dorothy Thompson @ 3:35 PM  
0 Comments:
Post a Comment
<< Home
 
About Me

Name: Dorothy Thompson
Home:
About Me: Dorothy Thompson is CEO/Founder of Pump Up Your Book, an innovative public relations agency specializing in online book promotion and social media marketing for authors.  Visit her website at www.pumpupyourbook.com.

See my complete profile
Previous Post
Archives
Links
Template by

Blogger Templates